Click a topic below to explore research and other resources relevant to the work of Generation All.

Education Systems Improvement
Materials covered under this topic will include information about equity, high school improvement, public education financing, capacity-building & leadership development.
    • Click here to download a printable version of this brief.

      • Excluding alternative schools, 88.2% of new Chicago public high schools opened since 1995 impose some kind of barrier to enrollment, whether through a lottery or selective criteria such as scoring above a minimum test score.
      • The burden of school closures and turnarounds has fallen primarily on African-American and Latino communities on the west and south sides of Chicago.
      • An open, inclusive, citywide planning process that considers neighborhood needs would allow for sound school placements that don’t create winners and losers.

      While no high schools were closed in the 2013 closings of 50 elementary schools, 46 high schools have been closed, turned around or consolidated since 1995. During the same time period, 139 high schools have opened, according to CPS Board of Education records and a 2011 analysis by Catalyst Chicago. This brief examines the location of these changes, what types of schools have been impacted, and how these openings and closings have increased the number of options for Chicago families but not their confidence in CPS as a school district that will serve them regardless of race, income, neighborhood, or ability.

    • Click here to download a printable copy of this brief.
      Chicago Public Schools recently announced that eighth graders in school year 2017-18 will be the first to utilize a single application for high school.  A single application has the potential to streamline the high school application experience; however, it can also impact enrollment and resources at neighborhood public high schools, and the sorting of students based on race, income and academic ability. The specific design of the application process, the algorithm for matching, and the outreach to parents, students, teachers and counselors are all important factors.
      Generation All supports efforts to engage parents, principals, students, teachers and others in meaningful ways to shape both the application process and algorithm that will match students to schools.  Both will have an impact on neighborhood public high schools and the families they serve.  We view the next year as an opportunity for the district to:
      • Create a transparent and meaningful community engagement process to inform the design of the application (how will students and families learn about the application and use it?) and to shape, test, and understand the algorithm used to match students to schools
      • Include school community leaders from neighborhood high schools at the decision making table in central office to ensure that the impact of the single application on neighborhood high schools and their students is explored
      • Explore using the algorithm to create student populations at each school that are diverse by abilities, socioeconomic background and other factors.
       
      Chicago should heed lessons learned from other cities and design its single application to ensure all students regardless of their backgrounds will receive a high quality learning experience.  Research from single application systems in Denver, New York City, and New Orleans shows that simplifying the high school selection process does not solve the twofold problem of  
      1) a lack of seats in high quality schools, and
       2) a lack of high quality schools that are equally distributed across the city.   
      Additionally, families in other cities with single application systems need more and better information about all schools and their programs and support around how best to utilize the application.  Relying only on students’ preferences can also lead to continued racial segregation and sorting based on academic ability. 

    • Learning Policy Institute (https://learningpolicyinstitute.org/)

      The Institute is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization with a focus on pre-K through high school. We conduct, commission and communicate independent, high-quality research to shape policies that improve learning for each and every child. We also collaborate with leaders in education, government, business and other fields who share a commitment to high-quality education and want to use evidence to guide their search for smart policy.

    • Can Professional Environments in Schools Promote Teacher Development? Explaining Heterogeneity in Returns to Teaching Experience

      “Our analyses show that teachers working in more supportive professional environments improve their effectiveness more over time than teachers working in less supportive contexts. On average, teachers working in schools at the 75th percentile of professional environment ratings improved 38% more than teachers in schools at the 25th percentile after 10 years.”

    • Actions Matter: How School Leaders Enact Equity Principles

      “We found that the principals’ enactments of equity varied in three ways: level of explicitness (explicit to implicit), type of issue (macro to micro), and indicators towards change (clear to unclear next steps). We argue that it is more likely that principals who were explicit about the equity issue and clear about next steps in their leadership practice, whether the issue was micro or macro, were more likely to disrupt historical inequities and allow all students to encounter more learning opportunities. The findings have implications for research and practice of principal support and evaluation. We add to the field of social justice leadership by illustrating what ‘enacting equity’ looks like in leadership practice.”

    • Preparing Leaders for Deeper Learning

      “As a growing body of schools and districts recognize the need for deeper, blended, competency-based learning environments for students, how must the role of leaders evolve to create and sustain them? And how then must leader preparation and ongoing professional development evolve to fully enable teacher and leader success in this new environment?”

    •  

    • How to Close the Opportunity Gap: Key Policy Recommendations

       

      “Students’ overall opportunities to learn are affected by multiple factors that arise both inside and outside of school. Significant educational growth will occur only when we comprehensively address these levels of influence. Our recommendations – at the level of students’ individual needs, at the level of in-school opportunities and resources, and at the level of communities and neighborhoods – are as follows:”

    • Rethinking Leadership: The Changing Role of Principal Supervisor

      “The Wallace Foundation’s Principal Pipeline Initiative operates in six districts—Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, Denver Public Schools, Gwinnett County Public Schools, Hillsborough County Public Schools, the New York City Department of Education, and Prince George’s County Public School — and puts in place new processes to help develop a larger corps of effective school principals. The goal is to test the following: If an urban district, and its principal training programs, provide a large number of talented aspiring principals with the right pre-service training and on-the-job support, the result will be a pipeline of principals able to improve teacher quality and student achievement, especially in schools with the greatest needs.

      The pipeline effort has highlighted the role of the people who manage principals— principal supervisors—and both the foundation and districts realized not much is known about this role. At Wallace’s request, CGCS visited the six sites to learn more about the work of principal supervisors as it is played out on the ground.

      Part I begins by briefly describing the general features of the principal supervisory structures in each of the six site visit districts. This section then presents comparisons and common themes observed across districts in the areas of organizational structures and the roles, selection, deployment, staffing, professional development, and evaluation of principal supervisors, as well as the preparation, selection, support, and evaluation of principals. Part II provides a set of recommendations for building more effective principal supervisory systems—those practices observed across districts that appear best positioned to positively impact the work of supervisors and principals and, ultimately, to improve student achievement.”

    • A Tripartite Framework for Leadership Evaluation

      “The Tripartite Framework for Leadership Evaluation provides a comprehensive examination of the leadership evaluation landscape and makes key recommendations about how the field of leadership evaluation should proceed. The chief concern addressed by this working paper is the use of student outcome data as a measurement of leadership effectiveness. Since leaders do not have direct influence over student achievement and mediate instructional influence with students through teachers, we find that the use of student test scores as a measurement of leadership effectiveness is neither fair nor useful. The collective actions of teachers and the leader lead to improved student achievement, but the leader should concentrate his or her work on teacher working conditions and teacher motivation as a part of that collective responsibility (Leithwood, 2012).

      A second concern in our work with urban leaders is the absence or surface treatment of race and equity in nearly all evaluation instruments or processes. We believe that to countermand the historical predictability of achievement outcomes for our most vulnerable students, attention should be directed specifically to the roles that urban school leaders play in fostering consistent attention to the structural issues of race and poverty. We contend that often the attention to race and equity do not get sufficient credit in leadership evaluation for the ways that school leaders build trust and keep equity concerns at the forefront of their work.

      Finally, we call for an overhaul of the conventional cycle of inquiry, which is based largely on needs analysis and leader deficits, and incomplete use of evidence to support recurring short cycles within the larger yearly cycle of inquiry.”

    • Eight Elements of High School Improvement: A Mapping Framework

      “The National High School Center’s goal is to encourage researchers, policymakers, and practitioners at all levels to engage in comprehensive, systemic efforts to maximize attainment for all high school students, with a focus on those students who have been historically underserved. To this end, we have developed a framework that consists of eight core elements and provides a lens for mapping school, district, and state high school improvement efforts. The exercise of mapping should inform strategic planning and implementation efforts by illuminating the connections among elements, revealing strengths and gaps in current state and district policies, and highlighting the stakeholders who should be aware of and involved in future improvement efforts.”

    • Christopher Edley, Jr., Co-Chair of the U.S. Department of Education’s Equity and Excellence Commission and former Dean of the University of California Berkeley School of Law offers a unique perspective on the equity challenges our nation faces. He explains the Commission’ recommendations, what we all must do to make equity and excellence a reality, and how community schools can contribute.

    • Carnegie Foundation Summit on Improvement in Education

      Click to see a Storify recap of the second annual Carnegie Foundation Summit on Improvement in Education. Participants learned to use improvement science to help guide their education systems improvement work. 

    • University of Oregon’s Presidential Chair and Director of the Institute for Global and Online Education Yong Zhao spoke at the Network for Public Education’s 2015 National Conference.

      “Out of basement readiness is the best kind of readiness for education. You may be ready for college, but college is no guarantee of out of basement readiness.”

      Watch his speech to find out how he defines that kind of readiness.

    • Easing Barriers to College Completion

      This news article profiles a young female CPS graduate now attending Monmouth College in rural Illinois. The article discusses the obstacles low-income college students of color face in graduating from college and whether high schools should be evaluated on their students’ college persistence rates despite disparities in resources schools have to effectively match students.

    • Canada’s Approach to School Funding: The Adoption of Provincial Control of Education Funding in Three Provinces

      “This report looks at how our neighbor to the north, Canada—a country that has consistently preformed well on international tests—funds its schools. Several provinces have successfully implemented school-funding systems that are more equitable than those in most U.S. states. To determine how Canada has gone about designing a more equitable school-funding scheme, this report focuses on three provinces—Alberta, British Columbia, and Ontario—each of which has adopted provincial-level funding systems that aim to achieve greater school-funding equality and equity. In these systems the province—which in terms of government organization roughly parallels the state level in the United States—has taken on full responsibility for its own education funding.”

    • Funding Gaps 2015: Too Many States Still Spend Less on Educating Students who Need the Most 

      “Nationally, the highest poverty school districts receive about 10 percent less per student in state and local funding than the lowest poverty districts.
      School districts serving the most students of color nationwide receive roughly 15 percent less per student in state and local funding than those serving the fewest.
      There is a great deal of variation between states when it comes to funding equity: While some states provide more funding to their highest poverty districts and to districts serving the most students of color, others provide substantially less.”

    • Pedro Noguera Presentation

    • Black Lives Matter: The Schott 50 State Report on Public Education and Black Boys  “This biennial report … shows that the opportunity gap continues to be the greatest for Black males of all racial/ethnic and gender groups and … the gap between graduation outcomes for Black males compared to their White male counterparts continues to widen. … Black males continue to be both pushed out and locked out of opportunities for academic achievement, including notable disparities in their enrollment in Advanced Placement courses and participation in Gifted and Talented programming. Furthermore, Black students were more likely to be classified as students with disabilities and were more likely to be suspended or expelled from school.”

    • Warren Simmons presentation_Dec 2014

    • The Federation For Community Schools (www.ilcommunityschools.org)

      The Federation for Community Schools believes that all children should have equal access to a high quality education that supports their academic, physical, social and emotional development – resulting from an alignment of strong schools working in partnership with community agencies that provide after school programming.

    • The Annenberg Institute (annenberginstitute.org)

      The Annenberg Institute is a national policy research and reform-support organization that works with urban districts and communities to improve the conditions and outcomes of schools, especially in urban communities and in those attended by traditionally underserved children. Their work focuses on three crucial issues in education reform today: school transformation, college and career readiness, and expanded learning time.

    • Trends in Chicago’s Schools across Three Eras of Reform: Summary of Key Findings

      – Graduation rates have improved along with high school test scores,

      – Math scores in elementary school and middle school also improved but reading remains the same

      – Racial gaps increased in terms of achievement and most graduates remain unprepared for college
      – This report provides background on administration goals based on personnel in each school reform era and the resulting policies
      – The authors suggest that the strengthening of schools’ organizational capacities may be more important than district wide reform

    • How High Schools Became Exemplary: Ways That Leadership Raises Achievement and Narrows Gaps By Improving Instruction In 15 Public High Schools

      This report is based off of a conference hosted by the Harvard Achievement Gap Initiative and identifies 15 schools across the nation and the strategies they used to improve. Test scores improved when school leaders focused on improving instruction.

    • Click here to download a printable version of this brief.

      • Excluding alternative schools, 88.2% of new Chicago public high schools opened since 1995 impose some kind of barrier to enrollment, whether through a lottery or selective criteria such as scoring above a minimum test score.
      • The burden of school closures and turnarounds has fallen primarily on African-American and Latino communities on the west and south sides of Chicago.
      • An open, inclusive, citywide planning process that considers neighborhood needs would allow for sound school placements that don’t create winners and losers.

      While no high schools were closed in the 2013 closings of 50 elementary schools, 46 high schools have been closed, turned around or consolidated since 1995. During the same time period, 139 high schools have opened, according to CPS Board of Education records and a 2011 analysis by Catalyst Chicago. This brief examines the location of these changes, what types of schools have been impacted, and how these openings and closings have increased the number of options for Chicago families but not their confidence in CPS as a school district that will serve them regardless of race, income, neighborhood, or ability.

    • Click here to download a printable copy of this brief.
      Chicago Public Schools recently announced that eighth graders in school year 2017-18 will be the first to utilize a single application for high school.  A single application has the potential to streamline the high school application experience; however, it can also impact enrollment and resources at neighborhood public high schools, and the sorting of students based on race, income and academic ability. The specific design of the application process, the algorithm for matching, and the outreach to parents, students, teachers and counselors are all important factors.
      Generation All supports efforts to engage parents, principals, students, teachers and others in meaningful ways to shape both the application process and algorithm that will match students to schools.  Both will have an impact on neighborhood public high schools and the families they serve.  We view the next year as an opportunity for the district to:
      • Create a transparent and meaningful community engagement process to inform the design of the application (how will students and families learn about the application and use it?) and to shape, test, and understand the algorithm used to match students to schools
      • Include school community leaders from neighborhood high schools at the decision making table in central office to ensure that the impact of the single application on neighborhood high schools and their students is explored
      • Explore using the algorithm to create student populations at each school that are diverse by abilities, socioeconomic background and other factors.
       
      Chicago should heed lessons learned from other cities and design its single application to ensure all students regardless of their backgrounds will receive a high quality learning experience.  Research from single application systems in Denver, New York City, and New Orleans shows that simplifying the high school selection process does not solve the twofold problem of  
      1) a lack of seats in high quality schools, and
       2) a lack of high quality schools that are equally distributed across the city.   
      Additionally, families in other cities with single application systems need more and better information about all schools and their programs and support around how best to utilize the application.  Relying only on students’ preferences can also lead to continued racial segregation and sorting based on academic ability. 

    • Can Professional Environments in Schools Promote Teacher Development? Explaining Heterogeneity in Returns to Teaching Experience

      “Our analyses show that teachers working in more supportive professional environments improve their effectiveness more over time than teachers working in less supportive contexts. On average, teachers working in schools at the 75th percentile of professional environment ratings improved 38% more than teachers in schools at the 25th percentile after 10 years.”

    • Actions Matter: How School Leaders Enact Equity Principles

      “We found that the principals’ enactments of equity varied in three ways: level of explicitness (explicit to implicit), type of issue (macro to micro), and indicators towards change (clear to unclear next steps). We argue that it is more likely that principals who were explicit about the equity issue and clear about next steps in their leadership practice, whether the issue was micro or macro, were more likely to disrupt historical inequities and allow all students to encounter more learning opportunities. The findings have implications for research and practice of principal support and evaluation. We add to the field of social justice leadership by illustrating what ‘enacting equity’ looks like in leadership practice.”

    • Preparing Leaders for Deeper Learning

      “As a growing body of schools and districts recognize the need for deeper, blended, competency-based learning environments for students, how must the role of leaders evolve to create and sustain them? And how then must leader preparation and ongoing professional development evolve to fully enable teacher and leader success in this new environment?”

    • How to Close the Opportunity Gap: Key Policy Recommendations

       

      “Students’ overall opportunities to learn are affected by multiple factors that arise both inside and outside of school. Significant educational growth will occur only when we comprehensively address these levels of influence. Our recommendations – at the level of students’ individual needs, at the level of in-school opportunities and resources, and at the level of communities and neighborhoods – are as follows:”

    • Rethinking Leadership: The Changing Role of Principal Supervisor

      “The Wallace Foundation’s Principal Pipeline Initiative operates in six districts—Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, Denver Public Schools, Gwinnett County Public Schools, Hillsborough County Public Schools, the New York City Department of Education, and Prince George’s County Public School — and puts in place new processes to help develop a larger corps of effective school principals. The goal is to test the following: If an urban district, and its principal training programs, provide a large number of talented aspiring principals with the right pre-service training and on-the-job support, the result will be a pipeline of principals able to improve teacher quality and student achievement, especially in schools with the greatest needs.

      The pipeline effort has highlighted the role of the people who manage principals— principal supervisors—and both the foundation and districts realized not much is known about this role. At Wallace’s request, CGCS visited the six sites to learn more about the work of principal supervisors as it is played out on the ground.

      Part I begins by briefly describing the general features of the principal supervisory structures in each of the six site visit districts. This section then presents comparisons and common themes observed across districts in the areas of organizational structures and the roles, selection, deployment, staffing, professional development, and evaluation of principal supervisors, as well as the preparation, selection, support, and evaluation of principals. Part II provides a set of recommendations for building more effective principal supervisory systems—those practices observed across districts that appear best positioned to positively impact the work of supervisors and principals and, ultimately, to improve student achievement.”

    • A Tripartite Framework for Leadership Evaluation

      “The Tripartite Framework for Leadership Evaluation provides a comprehensive examination of the leadership evaluation landscape and makes key recommendations about how the field of leadership evaluation should proceed. The chief concern addressed by this working paper is the use of student outcome data as a measurement of leadership effectiveness. Since leaders do not have direct influence over student achievement and mediate instructional influence with students through teachers, we find that the use of student test scores as a measurement of leadership effectiveness is neither fair nor useful. The collective actions of teachers and the leader lead to improved student achievement, but the leader should concentrate his or her work on teacher working conditions and teacher motivation as a part of that collective responsibility (Leithwood, 2012).

      A second concern in our work with urban leaders is the absence or surface treatment of race and equity in nearly all evaluation instruments or processes. We believe that to countermand the historical predictability of achievement outcomes for our most vulnerable students, attention should be directed specifically to the roles that urban school leaders play in fostering consistent attention to the structural issues of race and poverty. We contend that often the attention to race and equity do not get sufficient credit in leadership evaluation for the ways that school leaders build trust and keep equity concerns at the forefront of their work.

      Finally, we call for an overhaul of the conventional cycle of inquiry, which is based largely on needs analysis and leader deficits, and incomplete use of evidence to support recurring short cycles within the larger yearly cycle of inquiry.”

    • Eight Elements of High School Improvement: A Mapping Framework

      “The National High School Center’s goal is to encourage researchers, policymakers, and practitioners at all levels to engage in comprehensive, systemic efforts to maximize attainment for all high school students, with a focus on those students who have been historically underserved. To this end, we have developed a framework that consists of eight core elements and provides a lens for mapping school, district, and state high school improvement efforts. The exercise of mapping should inform strategic planning and implementation efforts by illuminating the connections among elements, revealing strengths and gaps in current state and district policies, and highlighting the stakeholders who should be aware of and involved in future improvement efforts.”

    • Easing Barriers to College Completion

      This news article profiles a young female CPS graduate now attending Monmouth College in rural Illinois. The article discusses the obstacles low-income college students of color face in graduating from college and whether high schools should be evaluated on their students’ college persistence rates despite disparities in resources schools have to effectively match students.

    • Canada’s Approach to School Funding: The Adoption of Provincial Control of Education Funding in Three Provinces

      “This report looks at how our neighbor to the north, Canada—a country that has consistently preformed well on international tests—funds its schools. Several provinces have successfully implemented school-funding systems that are more equitable than those in most U.S. states. To determine how Canada has gone about designing a more equitable school-funding scheme, this report focuses on three provinces—Alberta, British Columbia, and Ontario—each of which has adopted provincial-level funding systems that aim to achieve greater school-funding equality and equity. In these systems the province—which in terms of government organization roughly parallels the state level in the United States—has taken on full responsibility for its own education funding.”

    • Funding Gaps 2015: Too Many States Still Spend Less on Educating Students who Need the Most 

      “Nationally, the highest poverty school districts receive about 10 percent less per student in state and local funding than the lowest poverty districts.
      School districts serving the most students of color nationwide receive roughly 15 percent less per student in state and local funding than those serving the fewest.
      There is a great deal of variation between states when it comes to funding equity: While some states provide more funding to their highest poverty districts and to districts serving the most students of color, others provide substantially less.”

    • Black Lives Matter: The Schott 50 State Report on Public Education and Black Boys  “This biennial report … shows that the opportunity gap continues to be the greatest for Black males of all racial/ethnic and gender groups and … the gap between graduation outcomes for Black males compared to their White male counterparts continues to widen. … Black males continue to be both pushed out and locked out of opportunities for academic achievement, including notable disparities in their enrollment in Advanced Placement courses and participation in Gifted and Talented programming. Furthermore, Black students were more likely to be classified as students with disabilities and were more likely to be suspended or expelled from school.”

    • Trends in Chicago’s Schools across Three Eras of Reform: Summary of Key Findings

      – Graduation rates have improved along with high school test scores,

      – Math scores in elementary school and middle school also improved but reading remains the same

      – Racial gaps increased in terms of achievement and most graduates remain unprepared for college
      – This report provides background on administration goals based on personnel in each school reform era and the resulting policies
      – The authors suggest that the strengthening of schools’ organizational capacities may be more important than district wide reform

    • How High Schools Became Exemplary: Ways That Leadership Raises Achievement and Narrows Gaps By Improving Instruction In 15 Public High Schools

      This report is based off of a conference hosted by the Harvard Achievement Gap Initiative and identifies 15 schools across the nation and the strategies they used to improve. Test scores improved when school leaders focused on improving instruction.

    • Learning Policy Institute (https://learningpolicyinstitute.org/)

      The Institute is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization with a focus on pre-K through high school. We conduct, commission and communicate independent, high-quality research to shape policies that improve learning for each and every child. We also collaborate with leaders in education, government, business and other fields who share a commitment to high-quality education and want to use evidence to guide their search for smart policy.

    • Carnegie Foundation Summit on Improvement in Education

      Click to see a Storify recap of the second annual Carnegie Foundation Summit on Improvement in Education. Participants learned to use improvement science to help guide their education systems improvement work. 

    • The Federation For Community Schools (www.ilcommunityschools.org)

      The Federation for Community Schools believes that all children should have equal access to a high quality education that supports their academic, physical, social and emotional development – resulting from an alignment of strong schools working in partnership with community agencies that provide after school programming.

    • The Annenberg Institute (annenberginstitute.org)

      The Annenberg Institute is a national policy research and reform-support organization that works with urban districts and communities to improve the conditions and outcomes of schools, especially in urban communities and in those attended by traditionally underserved children. Their work focuses on three crucial issues in education reform today: school transformation, college and career readiness, and expanded learning time.

    •  

    • Christopher Edley, Jr., Co-Chair of the U.S. Department of Education’s Equity and Excellence Commission and former Dean of the University of California Berkeley School of Law offers a unique perspective on the equity challenges our nation faces. He explains the Commission’ recommendations, what we all must do to make equity and excellence a reality, and how community schools can contribute.

    • University of Oregon’s Presidential Chair and Director of the Institute for Global and Online Education Yong Zhao spoke at the Network for Public Education’s 2015 National Conference.

      “Out of basement readiness is the best kind of readiness for education. You may be ready for college, but college is no guarantee of out of basement readiness.”

      Watch his speech to find out how he defines that kind of readiness.

Teaching & Learning
Materials covered under this topic will include information about high quality curriculum and effective instruction, professional communities, leadership, school organization, culture and climate.
    • Learning Policy Institute (https://learningpolicyinstitute.org/)

      The Institute is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization with a focus on pre-K through high school. We conduct, commission and communicate independent, high-quality research to shape policies that improve learning for each and every child. We also collaborate with leaders in education, government, business and other fields who share a commitment to high-quality education and want to use evidence to guide their search for smart policy.

    • Language Education_Preparing Chicago Public School Students for a Global Community

    • Can Professional Environments in Schools Promote Teacher Development? Explaining Heterogeneity in Returns to Teaching Experience

      “Our analyses show that teachers working in more supportive professional environments improve their effectiveness more over time than teachers working in less supportive contexts. On average, teachers working in schools at the 75th percentile of professional environment ratings improved 38% more than teachers in schools at the 25th percentile after 10 years.”

    •  

    • Schools of Opportunity

      “A pilot initiative to identify and recognize public high schools that seek to close opportunity gaps through practices ‘that build on students’ strengths.'”

    •  Education for Life and Work: Developing Transferable Knowledge and Skills in the 21st century

      Private foundations, policymakers, and education organizations use a variety of names for the lists of broad skills seen as valuable. To help the public understand the research related to the teaching and learning of such skills, several foundations charged the National Research Council (NRC) to:

       Define the set of key skills that are referenced by the labels “deeper learning,” “twentyfirst century skills,” “college and career readiness,” “student-centered learning,” “nextgeneration learning,” “new basic skills,” and “higher-order thinking.”

       Describe how these skills relate to each other and to more traditional academic skills and content in the key disciplines of reading, mathematics, and science. I

       Summarize the findings of the research that investigates the importance of such skills to success in education, work, and other areas of adult responsibility and that demonstrates the importance of developing these skills in K–16 education

    • Identifying Effective Classroom Practices Using Student Achievement Data

      Abstract: “Recent research has confirmed both the importance of teachers in producing student achievement growth and in the variability across teachers in the ability to do that. Such findings raise the stakes on our ability to identify effective teachers and teaching practices. This paper combines information from classroom-based observations and measures of teachers’ ability to improve student achievement as a step toward addressing these challenges. We find that classroom based measures of teaching effectiveness are related in substantial ways to student achievement growth. Our results point to the promise of teacher evaluation systems that would use information from both classroom observations and student test scores to identify effective teachers. Our results also offer information on the types of practices that are most effective at raising achievement.”

    •  

      Creating a Comprehensive System for Evaluating and Supporting Effective Teaching

      “This publication, by Linda Darling Hammond, Charles E. Ducommun Professor of Education at Stanford University, was written at the request of and with the input of participants in the Albert Shanker Institute’s Good Schools seminars. It presents a comprehensive view on how to improve teacher preparation, make entry into the profession an educational and developmental experience, how to upgrade career and professional development, and what kind of models for evaluation make sense given the quality and integrity of current methods for doing that, including value added techniques.”

    • Supporting Student Success through Time and Technology: A Step by Step Guide

      “This guide is organized into two parts: The first profiles six expanded learning time schools across the country that have implemented blended learning for various purposes, in various ways, and with varying degrees of success. The second part of the guide offers a seven-step roadmap for planning and implementation, based on the experiences of the six schools profiled in part 1, along with insights from blended learning and expanded learning time experts.”

    • Learning Time and Educational Opportunity in California High Schools

      This report reveals that although most schools in California have similar amounts of time allotted for instruction, different communities experience this time in different ways.  More importantly, the report shows that “community stressors and chronic problems with school conditions lead to far higher levels of lost instructional time” in high-concentration poverty schools.

    •  The Effects of Increased learning time on student academic and nonacademic outcomes: Findings from a meta-analytic review

      “This report summarizes a review of rigorous research studies on increased learning time.
      • Increased learning time programs improved literacy and math achievement when instruction was led by certified teachers, though the effects were small.
      • Effects varied by type of instruction. Programs that used a traditional instruction style improved literacy and math achievement. Programs that used an experiential learning instruction style improved student social-emotional skills. In both cases the effects were small.
      • Increased learning time improved the literacy achievement of students performing below standards and the social-emotional skills of students with attention deficit/ hyperactivity disorder.”

    • Rebecca Wolfe presentation_Jan 2015

    • Quality Education for All – What the Research Tells Us_Nov 2014

      “This literature review aims to synthesize the existing research on the following three questions:
      I. What do we know about high-quality education for adolescents?
      II. What do we know about how to organize and support schools so they can provide a high quality education?
      III. What do we know about how school systems improve?
      It concludes by arguing that civic and grassroots engagement is necessary for whole system school reform. “

    • Language Education_Preparing Chicago Public School Students for a Global Community

    • Can Professional Environments in Schools Promote Teacher Development? Explaining Heterogeneity in Returns to Teaching Experience

      “Our analyses show that teachers working in more supportive professional environments improve their effectiveness more over time than teachers working in less supportive contexts. On average, teachers working in schools at the 75th percentile of professional environment ratings improved 38% more than teachers in schools at the 25th percentile after 10 years.”

    •  Education for Life and Work: Developing Transferable Knowledge and Skills in the 21st century

      Private foundations, policymakers, and education organizations use a variety of names for the lists of broad skills seen as valuable. To help the public understand the research related to the teaching and learning of such skills, several foundations charged the National Research Council (NRC) to:

       Define the set of key skills that are referenced by the labels “deeper learning,” “twentyfirst century skills,” “college and career readiness,” “student-centered learning,” “nextgeneration learning,” “new basic skills,” and “higher-order thinking.”

       Describe how these skills relate to each other and to more traditional academic skills and content in the key disciplines of reading, mathematics, and science. I

       Summarize the findings of the research that investigates the importance of such skills to success in education, work, and other areas of adult responsibility and that demonstrates the importance of developing these skills in K–16 education

    • Identifying Effective Classroom Practices Using Student Achievement Data

      Abstract: “Recent research has confirmed both the importance of teachers in producing student achievement growth and in the variability across teachers in the ability to do that. Such findings raise the stakes on our ability to identify effective teachers and teaching practices. This paper combines information from classroom-based observations and measures of teachers’ ability to improve student achievement as a step toward addressing these challenges. We find that classroom based measures of teaching effectiveness are related in substantial ways to student achievement growth. Our results point to the promise of teacher evaluation systems that would use information from both classroom observations and student test scores to identify effective teachers. Our results also offer information on the types of practices that are most effective at raising achievement.”

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      Creating a Comprehensive System for Evaluating and Supporting Effective Teaching

      “This publication, by Linda Darling Hammond, Charles E. Ducommun Professor of Education at Stanford University, was written at the request of and with the input of participants in the Albert Shanker Institute’s Good Schools seminars. It presents a comprehensive view on how to improve teacher preparation, make entry into the profession an educational and developmental experience, how to upgrade career and professional development, and what kind of models for evaluation make sense given the quality and integrity of current methods for doing that, including value added techniques.”

    • Supporting Student Success through Time and Technology: A Step by Step Guide

      “This guide is organized into two parts: The first profiles six expanded learning time schools across the country that have implemented blended learning for various purposes, in various ways, and with varying degrees of success. The second part of the guide offers a seven-step roadmap for planning and implementation, based on the experiences of the six schools profiled in part 1, along with insights from blended learning and expanded learning time experts.”

    • Learning Time and Educational Opportunity in California High Schools

      This report reveals that although most schools in California have similar amounts of time allotted for instruction, different communities experience this time in different ways.  More importantly, the report shows that “community stressors and chronic problems with school conditions lead to far higher levels of lost instructional time” in high-concentration poverty schools.

    •  The Effects of Increased learning time on student academic and nonacademic outcomes: Findings from a meta-analytic review

      “This report summarizes a review of rigorous research studies on increased learning time.
      • Increased learning time programs improved literacy and math achievement when instruction was led by certified teachers, though the effects were small.
      • Effects varied by type of instruction. Programs that used a traditional instruction style improved literacy and math achievement. Programs that used an experiential learning instruction style improved student social-emotional skills. In both cases the effects were small.
      • Increased learning time improved the literacy achievement of students performing below standards and the social-emotional skills of students with attention deficit/ hyperactivity disorder.”

    • Quality Education for All – What the Research Tells Us_Nov 2014

      “This literature review aims to synthesize the existing research on the following three questions:
      I. What do we know about high-quality education for adolescents?
      II. What do we know about how to organize and support schools so they can provide a high quality education?
      III. What do we know about how school systems improve?
      It concludes by arguing that civic and grassroots engagement is necessary for whole system school reform. “

    • Learning Policy Institute (https://learningpolicyinstitute.org/)

      The Institute is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization with a focus on pre-K through high school. We conduct, commission and communicate independent, high-quality research to shape policies that improve learning for each and every child. We also collaborate with leaders in education, government, business and other fields who share a commitment to high-quality education and want to use evidence to guide their search for smart policy.

    • Schools of Opportunity

      “A pilot initiative to identify and recognize public high schools that seek to close opportunity gaps through practices ‘that build on students’ strengths.'”

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Safe & Supportive Environments
Materials covered under this topic will include information about creating cultures both in and outside of school that address students’ social and emotional needs and hold them to high expectations around their post-secondary options.
Family, Community & Culture as Assets
Materials covered under this topic will include information about programs and policies that encourage schools to collaborate with community stakeholders so students feel pride in themselves, their families, communities, and school.
    • Community Schools: An Essential Equity Strategy

      “The Coalition for Community Schools, housed at the Institute for Educational Leadership, is an alliance of national, state and local organizations in education K-16, youth development, community planning and development, family support, health and human services, government and philanthropy as well as national, state and local community school networks. Together, we believe in community schools and its mission for our young people.”

    • Raising the Stakes: Investing in a Community School Model to Lift Student Achievement in Community School District 16

      “This report proposes a partnership between and among CSD16 school leadership, community stakeholders, and philanthropic partners that can serve as a replicable community school model. This proposed model would be funded by targeted investments in:  a structured collaboration between selected CSD16 schools, their principals, and teachers; a comprehensive menu of coordinated and effective out-of-school time programs; parent organizing and engagement efforts; school and student support services; research, tracking, and evaluation systems to make sure these initiatives effectively meet the needs of CSD16 families and school leaders.”

    • National Network of Partnership Schools at Johns Hopkins University

      “Established at Johns Hopkins University in 1996, NNPS invites schools, districts, states, and organizations to join together and use research-based approaches to organize and sustain excellent programs of family and community involvement that will increase student success in school.

      Researchers and facilitators at the Center on School, Family, and Community Partnerships at Johns Hopkins University work with the members of NNPS to study the nature and results of involvement. NNPS aims to increase knowledge of new concepts and strategies; use research results to develop tools and materials that will improve policy and practice; provide professional development conferences and workshops; share best practices of parental involvement and community connections; and recognize excellent partnership programs at the school, district, organization, and state levels.

      This website provides NNPS members with updated information, research results, and ideas for action from the NNPS staff and members across the country. The site also informs prospective members about NNPS approaches, benefits, and services.”

    • Christopher Edley, Jr., Co-Chair of the U.S. Department of Education’s Equity and Excellence Commission and former Dean of the University of California Berkeley School of Law offers a unique perspective on the equity challenges our nation faces. He explains the Commission’ recommendations, what we all must do to make equity and excellence a reality, and how community schools can contribute.

    • Community-Based Development And Local Schools: A Promising Partnership “This report introduces and explores the idea that schools might become important participants, contributors, and benefactors in a process of community development that values the internal assets of neighborhoods. Case studies of school/community partnerships gathered from around the country reveal some clear lessons about what works and what does not.”

    • The Federation For Community Schools (www.ilcommunityschools.org)

      The Federation for Community Schools believes that all children should have equal access to a high quality education that supports their academic, physical, social and emotional development – resulting from an alignment of strong schools working in partnership with community agencies that provide after school programming.

    • Raising the Stakes: Investing in a Community School Model to Lift Student Achievement in Community School District 16

      “This report proposes a partnership between and among CSD16 school leadership, community stakeholders, and philanthropic partners that can serve as a replicable community school model. This proposed model would be funded by targeted investments in:  a structured collaboration between selected CSD16 schools, their principals, and teachers; a comprehensive menu of coordinated and effective out-of-school time programs; parent organizing and engagement efforts; school and student support services; research, tracking, and evaluation systems to make sure these initiatives effectively meet the needs of CSD16 families and school leaders.”

    • Community-Based Development And Local Schools: A Promising Partnership “This report introduces and explores the idea that schools might become important participants, contributors, and benefactors in a process of community development that values the internal assets of neighborhoods. Case studies of school/community partnerships gathered from around the country reveal some clear lessons about what works and what does not.”

    • Community Schools: An Essential Equity Strategy

      “The Coalition for Community Schools, housed at the Institute for Educational Leadership, is an alliance of national, state and local organizations in education K-16, youth development, community planning and development, family support, health and human services, government and philanthropy as well as national, state and local community school networks. Together, we believe in community schools and its mission for our young people.”

    • National Network of Partnership Schools at Johns Hopkins University

      “Established at Johns Hopkins University in 1996, NNPS invites schools, districts, states, and organizations to join together and use research-based approaches to organize and sustain excellent programs of family and community involvement that will increase student success in school.

      Researchers and facilitators at the Center on School, Family, and Community Partnerships at Johns Hopkins University work with the members of NNPS to study the nature and results of involvement. NNPS aims to increase knowledge of new concepts and strategies; use research results to develop tools and materials that will improve policy and practice; provide professional development conferences and workshops; share best practices of parental involvement and community connections; and recognize excellent partnership programs at the school, district, organization, and state levels.

      This website provides NNPS members with updated information, research results, and ideas for action from the NNPS staff and members across the country. The site also informs prospective members about NNPS approaches, benefits, and services.”

    • The Federation For Community Schools (www.ilcommunityschools.org)

      The Federation for Community Schools believes that all children should have equal access to a high quality education that supports their academic, physical, social and emotional development – resulting from an alignment of strong schools working in partnership with community agencies that provide after school programming.

    • Christopher Edley, Jr., Co-Chair of the U.S. Department of Education’s Equity and Excellence Commission and former Dean of the University of California Berkeley School of Law offers a unique perspective on the equity challenges our nation faces. He explains the Commission’ recommendations, what we all must do to make equity and excellence a reality, and how community schools can contribute.

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Other Organizations Engaged in Relevant Work
Materials covered here will include links to local and national organizations that champion causes and topics connected to the mission of Generation All.
    • Every Hour Counts

      Students today need more ways to learn so they are prepared for college and career. But the young people who most need additional learning opportunities are least likely to have them. Every Hour Counts, formerly the Collaborative for Building After-School Systems (CBASS), is a coalition of citywide organizations that increase access to quality learning opportunities, particularly for underserved students. Our approach — called an expanded-learning system — coordinates the work of service providers, public agencies, funders, and schools, so dollars stretch farther and more young people are served. The result: students with better attendance, grades, and test scores; stronger work habits; and more positive social behaviors.

    • Easing Barriers to College Completion

      This news article profiles a young female CPS graduate now attending Monmouth College in rural Illinois. The article discusses the obstacles low-income college students of color face in graduating from college and whether high schools should be evaluated on their students’ college persistence rates despite disparities in resources schools have to effectively match students.

    • Time for Equity (www.timeforequity.org)

    • Jobs For The Future (www.jff.org)

      JFF is committed to using effective, student-centered approaches to engage every student regardless of skill level and prepare them for college, career, and civic success. They build the knowledge base for student-centered approaches to learning that lead to deeper learning outcomes and is supporting the spread of these practices and policy across the country

    • Alliance for Excellent Education (www.all4ed.org)

      The Alliance works to encourage the development and implementation of federal and national policies that support effective high school reform and increased student achievement and attainment. It works to synthesize and distribute research and information about promising practices that enlightens the national debate about education policies and options. The Alliance provides sound, objective, nonpartisan advice that informs decisions about policy creation and implementation.

    • The University of Chicago Consortium on Chicago School Research

      CCSR builds the capacity for school reform by conducting research that identifies what matters for student success and school improvement.

    • A+ NYC (aplusnyc.org)

      A+ NYC brings New Yorkers together to envision an excellent and equitable public school system under the city’s next administration.
      This report focuses on the centrality of teaching and learning over questions of structure and governance, elevate evidence-based reforms that will allow all students in our city to graduate college and career ready, and ensure that parents, students and other community stakeholders provide central leadership to the task of improving our schools.

    • Easing Barriers to College Completion

      This news article profiles a young female CPS graduate now attending Monmouth College in rural Illinois. The article discusses the obstacles low-income college students of color face in graduating from college and whether high schools should be evaluated on their students’ college persistence rates despite disparities in resources schools have to effectively match students.

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